#ITSOKAYTOTALK this World Suicide Prevention Day

Cruse Bereavement Care, as a member of the National Suicide Prevention Alliance (NSPA), is teaming up with Andy’s Man Clubs to encourage men to reach out for help and support when life feels overwhelming.

In the run-up to World Suicide Prevention Day, (Sept 10), Cruse is one of 70 organisations in England who are joining together in a big national unified push to reduce deaths by suicide, by telling men that ‘it’s okay to talk’.

The initiative comes after an online campaign of the same name reached millions of people globally last month.

TV stars, sportsmen, comedians and public figures all over the world shared pictures of themselves making an OK sign with their hands, alongside the hashtag #ITSOKAYTOTALK.

Now, Cruse is working with Halifax rugby player Luke Ambler, who created the campaign and founded the Andy’s Man Club support movement for men, after losing his brother to suicide earlier this year, to push the message out well beyond the internet.

Luke Ambler said: “We didn’t know anything was wrong with Andy, and then he took his own life. I don’t want anyone to go through what we continue to go through, so we’re delighted to be working with the National Suicide Prevention Alliance to get the message out that ‘it’s okay to talk’, to as many men as possible. If you’re struggling to cope, even if you think nobody will understand, take that first step, talk to someone, ring Samaritans, go and see a friend, speak to your GP. Your life matters.”

Statistics show that men are three times more likely to take their own lives than women and that suicide is the biggest killer of men under 50 in the UK. 

Cruse Bereavement Care in partnership with Samaritans offer Facing the Future groups giving those bereaved by suicide a unique space to share and communicate with each other. Diogo project manager for Cruse Bereavement and Facing the Future explains. “It’s particularly relevant for people bereaved by suicide because they are at more risk of suicide themselves than the rest of the population. So that’s why it’s so important to talk.”